Workout with the barn kids

Still recovering from covid and having some breathing issues lately, but I still showed up and did my best.

For the first part, I did fine. That was 10 rounds of 2:00 EMOM with…

8-10 bench press
8-10 toes to bar/medicine ball sit ups

The second workout was cardio and I only made it 2 round before calling it because I was out of breath. It took 4 minutes to recover to normal breathing…. So weird. So annoying.

Pandemic Post 4 :: Three on the Water

It wasn’t a great day. It wasn’t a warm day. It wasn’t a day when all of the locals showed up to kite. It wasn’t even a good wave day. But, it was a bonus session on a day that was supposed to be saturated with rain from early morning until… well, until Wednesday.

Ryan, Jay and I rolled in to MBSP parking lot shortly after 10 am and debated for far too long about which kite/board to employ. Eventually, Continue reading

10 Rules to Reverse the Email Spiral

From Chris Anderson – curator of TED.com

1. Respect Recipients’ Time
This is the fundamental rule. As the message sender, the onus is on YOU to minimize the time your email will take to process. Even if it means taking more time at your end before sending.
2. Short or Slow is not Rude
Let’s mutually agree to cut each other some slack. Given the email load we’re all facing, it’s OK if replies take a while coming and if they don’t give detailed responses to all your questions. No one wants to come over as brusque, so please don’t take it personally. We just want our lives back!
3. Celebrate Clarity
Start with a subject line that clearly labels the topic, and maybe includes a status category [Info], [Action], [Time Sens] [Low Priority]. Use crisp, muddle-free sentences. If the email has to be longer than five sentences, make sure the first provides the basic reason for writing. Avoid strange fonts and colors.
4. Quash Open-Ended Questions
It is asking a lot to send someone an email with four long paragraphs of turgid text followed by “Thoughts?”. Even well-intended-but-open questions like “How can I help?” may not be that helpful. Email generosity requires simplifying, easy-to-answer questions. “Can I help best by a) calling b) visiting or c) staying right out of it?!”
5. Slash Surplus cc’s
cc’s are like mating bunnies. For every recipient you add, you are dramatically multiplying total response time. Not to be done lightly! When there are multiple recipients, please don’t default to ‘Reply All’. Maybe you only need to cc a couple of people on the original thread. Or none.
6. Tighten the Thread
Some emails depend for their meaning on context. Which means it’s usually right to include the thread being responded to. But it’s rare that a thread should extend to more than 3 emails. Before sending, cut what’s not relevant. Or consider making a phone call instead.
7. Attack Attachments
Don’t use graphics files as logos or signatures that appear as attachments. Time is wasted trying to see if there’s something to open. Even worse is sending text as an attachment when it could have been included in the body of the email.
8. Give these Gifts: EOM NNTR
If your email message can be expressed in half a dozen words, just put it in the subject line, followed by EOM (= End of Message). This saves the recipient having to actually open the message. Ending a note with “No need to respond” or NNTR, is a wonderful act of generosity. Many acronyms confuse as much as help, but these two are golden and deserve wide adoption.
9. Cut Contentless Responses
You don’t need to reply to every email, especially not those that are themselves clear responses. An email saying “Thanks for your note. I’m in.” does not need you to reply “Great.” That just cost someone another 30 seconds.
10. Disconnect!
If we all agreed to spend less time doing email, we’d all get less email! Consider calendaring half-days at work where you can’t go online. Or a commitment to email-free weekends. Or an ‘auto-response’ that references this charter. And don’t forget to smell the roses.

Acknowledge Three Positives

In 2019, I added to my daily journal entries by recording three positive things that happened or occurred to me on that day.  I don’t know if anyone besides me will find value in this, but in the case that I might inspire someone else to add this to their mindset, I offer my 2019 positives list…

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2019 Things I Learned

Every year for the past… ummm… wow, it’s been a lot of years. The first of those lists was from 2014 and it’s still the last post on my previous blog site.  The lists started because the radio program that I listen to most mornings ends their daily broadcast with “what we learned”. They go around the room to each of the hosts and get a funny remark/synopsis of the day’s funny happenings.  Mine sort of started off that way. Then, they got more personal and meaningful.  Here’s my list for 2019. Many of these only have meaning to me. Some have been redacted because they were too personal or could expose me to issues that I’d rather not face in public yet… or ever.

You may notice a “Work Week” row in there, too. Each week, on Friday, I write down a few things that I accomplished at work that week. Then, when it comes to annual review time, I have 45 or so entries to look at instead of combing through a year’s worth of emails trying to figure out what the fuck I actually accomplished. It works great. And, if you have a weekly catch-up with your boss, it’s great to bring up to him/her during that call. Your weekly catch-up becomes 30 minutes of you bragging about what you accomplished.

This year, in addition to recording a “thing I learned” each day, I also added three positive things/thoughts to my daily recordings.  This was something that I adopted from my friend Catrina. Not sure exactly how it came about or how she uses it, I just know that she was my inspiration (as she often is). I may post that list too. I’ll have to see how much of it is too personal to share when I review it.

More after the break…

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